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Investigative journalism and political power in China

Subtitle:
Five newspapers' reporting of the Chenzhou Mass Corruption Case, February 2004–November 2008
Abstract:

It has long been held in the West that investigative journalism presents itself as an adversary to officialdom, exposing problems in the public domain and demanding a response from public officials. However, since much of the literature is based on experiences in the US and the UK, the way in which Chinese investigative journalists interact with politicians is not represented sufficiently.

This report begins by asking whether or not investigative journalism in China takes the same ad...

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Publication status:
Published
Peer review status:
Not peer reviewed
Version:
Publisher's version

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Institution:
University of Oxford
Department:
Social Sciences Division - Politics and International Relations - Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism
Role:
Author
Publisher:
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford Publisher's website
Series:
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Working Papers
Publication date:
2010-01-01
URN:
uuid:54ab75e2-11a2-409b-aa23-65a25f448609
Local pid:
ora:5326

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